Letter to the Editor, March 24: An open letter to the future one-day-a-week R-P


An open letter to the future one-day-a-week R-P

To the Editor,

An open letter to the Register-Pajaronian regarding your intention of going to a once only per week print paper (which will eventually lead to a no print paper at all).

Like President Trump said during the election, "I want to make America great again," I say to the remaining print papers including the Register-Pajaronian, "Let's make newspapers great again." And bring back the good ole' daily.

The Register-Pajaronian does not have to kowtow to tech and everything digital. The print newspaper can come back with a vengeance never seen in its history with kids on street corners yelling, "Read all about it." Why? Because most people do not spend time reading the news on the internet. They are shopping, on social media, or entertaining themselves with the seemingly infinite number of special interest websites. Most just gloss over the news and move on to what makes them happy.

Added to this is the increasing reality that gazing into a computer screen, or phone, for the better part of your day — the part you get paid for, work — creates fatigue, that is ultimately unhealthy. I know that in my free time I want to take a break from the screen. Just get away from it. Unplug. Just sit down with a print newspaper you do not have to plug in or turn on; a print newspaper that leaves ink on your hands.

For this renaissance to happen, newspapers need to focus on the basics. Getting a reasonably priced product to the customer. New newspaper machines are a must. Machines that accept dollar bills and cards where you can get credit. And of course keeping coin capability for those who love going to the business next door and asking for 10 quarters to buy a New York Times.

And the new machines should feature incentives of coupons you cannot find anywhere else. Advertisement literally hot off the presses.

Newspapers should be in places where they can be seen. At the entrance of private companies and their cafeterias. On populous street corners. Inside and out of convenience and grocery stores. Or if not machines, actual people, human beings, working a job, selling them.

With most people's heads buried in all sorts of gadgetry, the logical advertising point of the new 21st century newspaper will be: "Take a break. Unplug. Relax. Get ready to be moved."

It is my belief newspapers (and the Register-Pajaronian) can be so hot again, with the return of morning, afternoon and late editions with plentiful machines and/or enthusiastic kids and colorful cigar smoking adults on street corners: "Extra extra extra, read all about it!"

Charles Birimisa

Watsonville

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